Brent2

Hey, I’m Brent! I’m a member of the Education Team in the Center for Distance Health at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock. I am excited about attending the upcoming South Central Telehealth Forum (#SCTF2016), which is being held in Nashville on August 1 & 2.

I consider myself somewhat of a Foodie because I enjoy trying new foods and searching for unique dining experiences. On a recent road trip to Nashville, I ate at some interesting places, so I wanted to share my discoveries and experiences with you!

If you get out and about in the city during #SCTF2016, you may want to check out this restaurant. For more information about the conference, click here!

Buckle up, and let’s go for a ride…Foodie Style!

___________________________________________________________________________________________

HattieBs
hattieb.com

Locations: 112 19th Avenue South (615.678.4794)

5209 Charlotte Pike (615.712.7137)

Hours: Monday – Friday: 11 am to 2 am

Saturday – Sunday: 10 am t0 2 am

Parking: Limited restaurant parking, but paid parking is available on the street
 

Reservation:

No reservation required

Menu available online

Cost: Entrees range from $10 – $15
Time Needed:  

An hour or less, but expect longer ordering lines during regular meal times

My Rating: 4/5
Social Media  

Website: http://www.hattieb.com

Facebook: Hattie B’s Hot Chicken

Twitter: @HattieBs

Instagram: hattiebs


The History of Nashville’s Hot Chicken and Hattie B’s

It has been reported that Nashville’s famous hot chicken was the result of a scorned woman’s punishment for a cheating man. A  National Public Radio article quoted Andre Prince, owner of a hot chicken establishment in Nashville, “hot chicken was originally conceived as a punishment for her great uncle Thornton Prince, known for his womanizing back in the 1930s.” His chicken was covered in hot pepper. It turned out that Thornton Prince enjoyed his punishment, and much to the joy of his friends, opened a hot chicken establishment.

Nick Bishop paid attention to the success of Nashville’s hot chicken. Gene, Nick’s father, had been in the restaurant business since high school. He worked his way up to CEO of Morrison’s Cafeterias and oversaw the restaurant chain, Ruby Tuesday. His son, Nick, joined Morrison’s and learned the ropes. Eventually, the father and son opened Hattie B’s Hot Chicken, which was named after Gene’s wife.

 

The Restaurant

Hattie has a “fast-casual” dining atmosphere. You walk in, order from a menu board on the wall, get a number and the food is brought to your table.

Seating was limited, and I had to sit with people that I didn’t know. It made enjoying my meal somewhat uncomfortable. Indoor seating consisted of a few tables with chairs. A small patio was also available.

 

The Menu

The menu consisted of sandwiches, tenders and fried chicken plates with an assortment of sides. You choose the level of heat for your chicken when you order. Local and domestic beer was available along with soft drinks and iced tea. Entrees range from $10 – $20.


My Food Order

hattieb1

I went to the restaurant for lunch, and I ordered the small dark plate with medium heat with collard greens and macaroni salad. The greens were awesome!

 

Make Your Own Nashville Hot Chicken at Home

If you would like to try frying your own Nashville hot chicken at home, the Food Network has a recipe for you!

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/hattie-bs-hot-chicken.html

 

My Rating – 4/5

I rate Hattie B’s a 4 out of 5. The food was excellent, but the atmosphere was lacking. There wasn’t enough seating available for the number of customers.  The order line was out the door, so it took a while to get to the ordering counter.

Hattie B’s is “must try” when motoring around the Music City! I would suggest carry out with a picnic in the local area.